Women and Power at the Alta Club

January 11, 2018

Gender inequality is today's hot topic—we hope it's tomorrow's topic too. In this era of #metoo and #timesup, it's interesting to look back on some barrier-bashing in our own Salt Lake City. It wasn't until a century after the Alta Club's founding that women  were allowed to become members.  Salt Lake Speaks features a conversation with the first woman member, Genevieve Atwood,  about the legacy of the Alta Club, how it feels to have been the first woman admitted and whether that mattered.

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UMFA Exhibits a Disturbing View of Western American History.

January 10, 2018

As part of it's exhibit Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, queer artist and member of the Catawba Tribe DeLesslin George-Warren will lead Indigenous Corps of Discovery tours. The tours will examine more than eighty original artworks by Euro-American and Plains Indian artists as Delessliin strips away the age-old myths and explains that westward expansion was a catastrophe for native Americans and their culture that usually led to genocide. Roo, as DeLesslin is known, joined Managing Editor Glen Warchol on Salt Lake Speaks.

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A Sexual Cultural Upheaval

January 2, 2018

Documentary director Diana Whitten talks to Managing Editor Glen Warchol about sexual abuse in film and society.

Salt Lake Speaks welcomed Diana Whitten, a director, producer, and founder of the Utah Chapter of Film Fatales, to sit down and discuss the rash of sexual abuse incidents coming out of Hollywood and government. Film Fatales is a community of women filmmakers who collaborate and mentor each other in a male-dominated industry.

Whitten says the past year's upheaval—including reported sexual abuse by Harvey Weinstein, Dustin Hoffman, Louis C.K., Kevin Spacey and others—is part of a cultural shift that will continue and ultimately benefit women and the film industry.

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The Forecast for Utah’s Future Winters Looks Bleak

January 2, 2018

You don't need to be a scientist to notice that Utah's weather has been changing drastically for the past several years, but the science sure helps when you're trying to decide when to open the resorts. This year, the snow came early (yay!) and then disappeared (boo!). Many resorts pushed back their opening dates by weeks and even after finally opening the lifts, had to close due to lack of snow and warm temperatures. Brian McInerney, Hydrologist and Lisa Verzella, Observations Program Leader and Forecaster for the Salt Lake City Forecast Weather Office have the numbers, charts and scientific experience to help us understand what is happening with the weather and what Utahns can expect moving forward.

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‘Tis the Season for Bubbly: Making Champagne Accessible

December 21, 2017
 
Francis Fecteau of Libation talks with Editor Mary Brown Malouf about her favorite beverage: sparkling wine. Listen to this before buying your holiday wines.
 
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This Immeasurable Place: It’s more than just a National Monument

December 13, 2017
Blake Spalding, co-owner of the famous restaurant Hell's Backbone Grill on the edge of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, talks about the relationship between food, place and people.
 
 
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The Challenge of Satire on Stage

December 7, 2017

Politics are not new to the world of theatre. Playwrights have been needling and instigating controversial discussion for centuries. One of the first anti-war comedies was written in 411 B.C. Aristophanes’s Lysistrata, which centers around a female-led-sex-strike, was actually banned in the United States in 1873 as obscene. And the clash between theater and the powers that be has continued ever since. So it’s no surprise a recent production of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. New York’s Public Theatre‘s assassinated resembled President Donald Trump and lost the support of major sponsors, including Delta Airlines.

Salt Lake Acting Company annually produces Saturday’s Voyeur—a cabaret show poking fun at local and national politics, as well as the so-called “dominant” Mormon culture. What is the art’s responsibility to launch controversial discussions? Where do you draw the line between satire and bullying?

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The Tiny Miracles of Utah

December 7, 2017

Pregnancy is a time of joy, anticipation and lots of planning. But what happens when things don’t go according to plan? Each year 10 to 15 percent of babies born in the U.S are admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit.  Most are premature or have a medical condition that requires special care. In our 2017 November/December issue we sat down with three families who’s birth experience did not go to plan. But what they get instead, they say, are tiny miracles. Joining us today is the Joy family.

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Drawing the Line between Good and Bad Art

December 4, 2017

The definition of art has been an ongoing discussion that spans centuries, and it seems will continue moving forward. The best answer most people come up with is, “art is in the eye of the beholder.” But that becomes even more complicated when the topic evolves into whether a specific piece of art is good or bad. It is one thing if an individual chooses to go see a play, concert or museum, but where does public art fit into a community like Salt Lake City? Who is doing the curating, who is doing the creating and who gets to do the criticizing? On this week’s episode, Joy Haynes and Steven Labrum of 3Irons, a two person creativity support group discuss the ins and outs of creating and experiencing art and what it means to Utah’s art community. cleardot.gif

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American Nouveau

November 28, 2017

Andrew Cliburn, general manager at Current Fish & Oyster, introduces the Beaujolais Nouveau alternative—natural American wine. Learn about these wines at by listening to the podcast and taste the wines tomorrow, Wednesday, November 19 at 6 p.m. at Current Fish & Oyster.

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